Mud & Manure Management

Management

Managing Small-acreage Horse Farms for Green Pastures, Clean Water, and Healthy Horses - This publication, tailored for small acreages discusses basic management strategies for managing horses and pastures to reduce mud and muck on the farm. Management practices include rain gutters, sacrifice areas, buffer strips, pasture rotation, well water protection, and manure management. These practices apply to all species of livestock.

Managing Small-acreage Horse Farms in Central and Eastern Oregon - This publication, tailored for small acreages discusses basic management strategies for managing horses and pastures to reduce mud and muck on the farm in Central and Eastern Oregon. Management practices include rain gutters, sacrifice areas, buffer strips, pasture rotation, well water protection, and manure management. These practices apply to all species of livestock.

Manure Management in Small Farm Livestock Operations: Protecting Surface and Groundwater - Many Oregonians own small acreages and raise a few livestock, for example, cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, llamas, or chickens. These owners can enhance their farm's productivity by managing manure as a soil amendment. Manure is a source of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and many micro nutrients that can increase soil fertility. It also is a source of organic matter, which can improve soil water-holding capacity and tilth.

Composting: An Alternative for Livestock Manure Management and Disposal of Dead Animals - Livestock producers constantly face the challenge of managing manure and meeting environmental regulations. Composting is a possible alternative for handling manure. The benefits include reduced volume, enhanced soil fertility and texture, and reduced environmental risk.

Fertilizing with Manure - Manure is a good source of plant nutrients and organic matter. Properly managed manure application recycles nutrients to pastures and crops, improve soil quality and protect water resources. Learn about nutrient content of manure, availability of manure nutrients to crops and application variability.

Annual Manure Application Schedule for Western Oregon - The overall objective of manure management should be to take as many excretable manure nutrients to the soil and have them used by plants for optimal crop yield. This reduces the need to purchase feed and inorganic fertilizer. The usual outcome of manure management is finding as many acres as possible for manure application. Manure application scheduling depends on the type of manure.

Dairy Manure as a Fertilizer Source - Manure can supply nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and several other nutrients needed for forage production. More than half the nutrients in dairy rations are excreted in manure. The key to managing manure is to treat it as a resource by recycling these nutrients to produce forage.

Keeping Track of Manure Nutrients in Dairy Pastures - The current recommendation is to fertilize pastures at a level to replace, in equal measure, the nutrients removed through grazing or cutting each year. For operations with grazing animals, determining manure application rates and forage consumption can be challenging. This publication will help you work through this process. These general methods apply to many livestock species.